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B-25 Mitchell & SBD-5 Dauntless - Chino

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B-25 Mitchell

Also see:
Mitch the Witch II - Palm Springs Air
Maid in the Shade - Centennial
Lazy Daisy Mae - Castle Air
B-25 Mitchell - American Aircraft


B-25 Mitchell
"Photo Fanny"

This B-25 Mitchell can often be seen flying at air shows, commemorating the Doolittle Raiders with mock bombing runs. B-25 "Photo Fanny" was also used in the movie Pearl Harbor which portrayed the raid. To boost moral as a 'strike back' against Japan after the bombing of B-25 nose art, Photo FannyPearl Harbor, the Doolittle Raid was carried out on April 18, 1942. The B-25 US Army mediumbombers took off from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet in a surprise bombing raid which attacked military and industrial targets in the Tokyo area.


The nose art on this B-25 is “Photo Fanny”. WWII era nose art was used as a way to personalize the aircraft and although it was not officially approved by the military, it was often allowed as a moral booster. The subject matter varied greatly, but a common subject was the pinup girl.

SBD Dauntless at Planes of Fame Air Museum

Also see:
Dauntless - Palm Springs Air
SBD - USS Hornet Aircraft carrier
SBD Dauntless - American Aircraft
SBD - USS Hornet Aircraft carrier
SBD - Naval Aviation Centennial


Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless Navy dive bomber

This particular aircraft was flown by Royal New Zealand Air Force and saw combat in the South Pacific during 1944. It is one of only a few SBD5's left that is in flying flying today. It has US markings and the number 39 on both sides. Its cockpit was used for scenes in the movie Midway. Showing in the photo to the right below, are the twin 30 caliber machine guns that would have been manned by the rear gunner.


Machine guns on SBD Dauntless

The SBD Dauntless, with the popular nickname of 'Slow but Deadly', is probably best known for sinking all four of the Japanese aircraft carriers present at the Battle of Midway in 1942, which included the Akagi, Kaga, Soryu, and Hiryu. These aircraft carriers were four of the six carriers that were used by the Japanese in the attack on Pearl Harbor. With the sinking of all four of the carriers, there was no place for the airborne Japanese aircraft to land. Because of this, all of the Japanese aircraft involved in the initial attack of Midway were destroyed. The first three of the Japanese aircraft carriers had fuel and bombs on the fight deck when they were bombed, so a very high percentage of the Japanese air crews were killed. After the Battle of Midway, the Japanese Navy was so short on trained flyers that partially trained pilots had to be used.

~ Photos taken at Planes of Fame Air Museum - Chino, CA


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